Building Engagement with Distance Learning

TIES Distance Learning Table of Contents
Organized by Learning Component

The Distance Learning articles are organized by the priority Learning Components that provide multiple ​learning opportunities in inclusive environments across the day for students with significant cognitive disabilities. For a full description of the Learning Components refer to Distance Learning Engagement: An Overview Framework.

Distance Learning article list (Google Doc)

   

DL Number 7

Self-Determined Schedule Making

This article includes two strategies for helping parents support their child in planning their daily schedule and following through using time management skills. These resources can help all students, including students with significant cognitive disabilities, build independence in creating and implementing daily routines for at-home learning.

   

DL Number 8

Time Management During Distance Learning

This article includes a strategy for helping parents support their child in following through using time management skills. These resources can help all students, including students with significant cognitive disabilities, build independence in creating and implementing daily routines for at-home learning.

   

DL Number 2

A Collaborative Start to Behavioral Supports

Positive and consistent behavioral supports are needed by all students, and for some students, they are absolutely vital for meaningful engagement to be achieved. By intentionally identifying, collaboratively communicating, and consistently following through on the identified supports, students with significant cognitive disabilities are more able to participate and engage meaningfully through distance learning. 

  

DL Number 3

Effective Specially Designed Instruction (SDI) Within the Distance Learning Environment: What in the World Does That Look Like?

During a move to distance and online learning, educators and administrators are struggling with what it means to provide specially designed instruction for students with the most significant disabilities. TIES Center has some considerations around the initial basic questions for supporting students with IEPs.

   

DL Number 6

Getting "Unstuck:" Tips to Help Your Child If They Get Stuck with Their Remote Learning

This article includes 4 tips to help parents support their children when they are stuck in their learning during remote learning. These tips can help all students, including those with significant cognitive disabilities, build independence with their own learning.

  

DL Number 10

Distance Learning and Communication Systems

Students who are learning or using Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) systems have added barriers to learning. Here are some ways to support those students even when you aren’t all together.

  

DL Number 11

Embedding Instruction at Home

Grade level standards-based curriculum can be taught through authentic learning activities at home. By embedding instruction in home activities, students apply and practice the content in meaningful ways in their own homes. The three-step process provides a means for collaboratively problem-solving how to apply the content during distance learning.

   

DL Number 15

Data Collection and Distance Learning

Distance learning does not mean that legal requirements for meeting the needs of students with disabilities have stopped. Educators and administrators are struggling with how to collect and use data in a distance learning structure. This resource provides concrete strategies and tips.

  

DL Number 16

Increasing Opportunities to Respond and Provide Feedback to Students with Significant Cognitive Disabilities in Inclusive Online Environments

This Distance Learning Series article helps inform teachers how to deliver effective feedback to students with significant cognitive disabilities through asynchronous (online, not live with a teacher) and synchronous (online, live with a teacher) learning environments. 

  

DL Number 22

Grading Considerations for Inclusive Classrooms in an Online Environment

Grading students with significant cognitive disabilities through distance learning requires carefulthought into what grades really mean and how to quantify student learning in a way that isenriching for all students.

   

DL Number 1

Morning Meetings

One of the most important ways to help students feel safer and more in control is to build schedules and routines they can count on. Many elementary classrooms use morning meetings to check-in with students and lay out the goals of the day.

  

DL Number 12

Promoting Engagement for Students with Significant Cognitive Disabilities on Group Learning Platforms

This article helps answer the question of how to keep students with significant cognitive disabilities engaged in an inclusive way during this time when teachers are delivering instruction through online learning platforms. 

   

DL Overview

Distance Learning Engagement: An Overview Framework - Update!

Building Engagement with Distance Learning provides a framework for supporting all students, including those with significant cognitive disabilities, to actively:

  • Interact with others; Engage with classmates;
  • Learn grade-level general education curriculum and other essential skills; and
  • Participate in routines and transitions

   

DL Number 4

Dealing with Uncertainty: A Plea for Thoughtful Plans and Patient Collaboration

Systems change is always a challenge. During a pandemic, it is a huge and unexpected change for everyone, including districts, teachers and families. None of us are experts in this area...yet. That will come, but in the meantime, we need to allow the space and patience for each of us and ourselves to grow.

  

DL Number 5

Reflections About Individualizing Supports for Children and Families: Olivia’s Story

Olivia is a teenager, at home experiencing distance learning just like everyone else. She also has autism as an attribute. This is a reflection that her mother shared regarding what school teams need to take into consideration right now.

  

DL Number 9

Start Now to Plan for Students Transitioning Back to School

Even as teams continue developing their skills to provide distance learning to students with significant cognitive disabilities, states are discussing various scenarios for when and how-to bring students back to schools. Proactively thinking now about what needs to be considered to successfully transition students back to school will help facilitate this transition.

  

DL Number 13

Distance Learning is Emotional Work: Tips for Parents and Caregivers

This article includes tips to help caregivers, parents, and children manage their emotions -These tips can help all learners, including students with significant cognitive disabilities, gain self-regulation and executive functions skills that are critical for learning.  

  

DL Number 14

Teachers: Understand and Communicate about Emotions to Support Deep Learning

This article includes 4 tips to help educators help and children understand their emotions -These tips can help all learners, including students with significant cognitive disabilities, gain self-regulation and executive functions skills that are critical for learning.  

  

DL Number 17

Planning for Instruction both at School and Distance Learning: The 5C Process

This article provides a process for planning the learning priorities and steps to plan and transition between inclusive instructional programs for students with significant cognitive disabilities at school and at home during periods of distance learning. The 5C Process are key: learning components, collaboration, continuity, collecting data, and capacity building. 

  

DL Number 18

Preparing for the First Week of School

Planning for the 2020-21 school year may seem a bit different than planning for previous years.  Here are some checklists and ideas for getting ready for successful communication with families, peers, and students.

  

DL Number 19

The First Days of School

The first days of school may look a little different if you are teaching in-person, online or a combination of both, but the need to set norms and classroom routines are necessary.

  

DL Number 21

Distance Learning and Deafblindness: Learning From Parents

Looking for inspiration to help you with the new academic year? In this DL article, we highlight the voices of parents of children with deafblindness. Check out collective wisdom on how to be more proactive and inclusive in distance learning.