Accommodations Toolkit

Test Breaks: States’ Accessibility Policies, 2020

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National Center on Educational Outcomes (NCEO)

This summary of states’ accessibility policies for test breaks is part of the Accommodations Toolkit published by the National Center on Educational Outcomes (NCEO).[1] The toolkit also contains a summary of the research literature on test breaks.

Accessibility policies often have several tiers of accessibility features: universal features, designated features, and accommodations.[2] Figures 1 and 2 summarize how states included test breaks in their accessibility policies for students with disabilities and English learners in 2020. Table 1 shows how test breaks was included in the policies, while Table 2 contains additional details and specifications. 

Figure 1. States’ Accessibility Policies for Test Breaks for Students with Disabilities, 2020

Reading/ELA/Writing

  • Universal Features (U): 25 States
  • Designated Features (D): 5 States
  • Accommodations (A): 16 States

Math

  • Universal Features (U): 25 States
  • Designated Features (D): 5 States
  • Accommodations (A): 16 States

Science

  • Universal Features (U): 22 States
  • Designated Features (D): 5 States
  • Accommodations (A): 16 States

Figure 2. States’ Accessibility Policies for Test Breaks for English Learners, 2020

Reading/ELA/Writing

  • Universal Features (U): 25 States
  • Designated Features (D): 5 States
  • Accommodations (A): 2 States

Math

  • Universal Features (U): 25 States
  • Designated Features (D): 5 States
  • Accommodations (A): 2 States

Science

  • Universal Features (U): 22 States
  • Designated Features (D): 5 States
  • Accommodations (A): 2 States

Table 1. Accommodations Policies for Test Breaks by State, 2020

U = Universal Feature, D = Designated Feature, A = Accommodation, ELA = English Language Arts, X = Allowed, SD = Allowed for Students with Disabilities, E = Allowed for English Learners, Blank cell = no policy found, N = Notes in Table 2

State

Reading/ELA/Writing

Math

Science

Notes

(See Table 2)

U

D

A

U

D

A

U

D

A

Alabama

X

X

X

N

Alaska

SD

SD

SD

Arizona

X

SD

X

SD

X

SD

N

Arkansas

SD

SD

SD

N

California

X

X

X

N

Colorado

SD

SD

SD

N

Connecticut

X

SD

X

SD

X

SD

N

Delaware

X

X

X

N

District of Columbia

X

X

X

N

Florida

SD

SD

SD

N

Georgia

X

SD

X

SD

X

SD

N

Hawaii

X

X

X

N

Idaho

X

X

X

N

Illinois

X

X

X

N

Indiana

SD, E

SD, E

SD, E

N

Iowa

X

X

X

N

Kansas

Kentucky

Louisiana

Maine

X

X

X

N

Maryland

X

X

X

N

Massachusetts

X

X

X

Michigan

X

X

X

N

Minnesota

N

Mississippi

SD

SD

SD

Missouri

X

X

X

N

Montana

X

X

X

N

Nebraska

Nevada

X

X

N

New Hampshire

New Jersey

SD

SD

SD

New Mexico

New York

SD

SD

SD

N

North Carolina

X

X

X

N

North Dakota

X

X

X

N

Ohio

X

X

X

N

Oklahoma

SD

SD

SD

N

Oregon

X

X

X

N

Pennsylvania

SD, E

SD, E

SD, E

N

Rhode Island

N

South Carolina

X

X

X

N

South Dakota

X

X

X

N

Tennessee

SD

SD

SD

N

Texas

Utah

X

X

X

N

Vermont

X

X

N

Virginia

SD

SD

SD

N

Washington

X

X

X

N

West Virginia

X

SD

X

SD

X

SD

N

Wisconsin

X

X

X

N

Wyoming

X

X

X

N

Total (Students with DIsabilities)

25

5

16

25

5

16

22

5

16

Total (Enlgish Learners)

25

5

2

25

5

2

22

5

2

Note: Blank cell = no policy found

Table 2. Details and Specifications: States’ Test Breaks Accessibility Policies

State

Details/Specifications

Alabama

Accessibility Support:

Breaks are designed to permit students, based on their medical, behavioral, or physical needs, the opportunity to take breaks as needed during a single test session. There is no limit on the number of breaks that a student might be given. The use of this support may result in the student needing additional time to complete the assessment.

Arizona

Universal Feature:

Individual students may take a stretch break (1 or 2 minutes) during test session (students cannot talk, use electronic devices, or leave the testing room during the break).

  • Paper test booklet/answer document and scratch paper must be turned over
  • CBT must be in “Pause” status

Accommodation:

Rest/Breaks – Individual students may take short breaks during testing sessions to rest.

  • PBT - Test Administrator must collect paper test booklet document
  • CBT - Test must be in “Pause” status

Arkansas

Breaks as Needed:

Definition: Breaks with the test time paused, in addition to breaks scheduled for all examinees. Different than a restroom break. Type: Accommodation Recommended Usage: Examinees with medical conditions which require immediate response, examinees with behavioral concerns which require sensory breaks for calming Personal Needs Profile Selection: Breaks - Supervised within Each Day Notes: Examinees indicate when they need to take a break, and when they are ready to resume testing. Examinees may not interact with other examinees when taking a break. There may be a time limit for breaks as needed listed in the administration manual. Breaks may not be overnight. Extra testing time may also be authorized.

California

For CAASPP the number of items per session can be flexibly defined based on the student’s need. Students may take a break when needed. Students may require extra time to complete the assessment if using this resource.

Colorado

Administrative Consideration:

Frequent Breaks that DO NOT Stop the Testing Clock Students must complete each test unit within the specified unit testing time (by content area). Breaks do not stop the testing clock. During breaks, cover or close student testing device screens or paper-based materials. Students are not allowed to have anything that is prohibited during testing during their breaks. Students are to remain in the testing environment for breaks during each testing unit. Students may stand up, walk around, or engage in similar activities. The exception for students remaining in the testing environment is for the restroom. In these cases, plan for an escort to minimize the student’s interactions with other students on a different testing schedule. Assess students in an individual testing environment or in a group testing environment for students with similar break needs. Maintain the secure standardized testing environment, and break activity must not distract other students in the testing environment. Students may not interact with one another; only interactions with adults are allowed. Students may not discuss any questions or their answers on the assessment during breaks. Reading, accessing the internet, or making and/or receiving phone calls is not allowed during a break.

Accommodation:

Stop-the-Clock Breaks Available to students as documented on their IEP or 504 plan. Students requiring stop-the-clock breaks typically experience extreme fatigue or have other medical needs that must be addressed while testing (e.g., check blood sugar, visit nurse).

Medical Notes:

  • Students may leave the testing environment to take care of medical needs. Efforts must be made to minimize interaction with other students during this time.
  • For unforeseeable medical concerns such as seizure activity, follow “ill during testing” procedures.
  • For other medical concerns such as testing blood sugar levels, or visual fatigue (students with a documented vision impairment only), breaks are untimed and should not be counted towards “testing time”.

Outside of stop-the-clock breaks, students must complete each unit within the unit testing time. Test Administrators must track start and end time of breaks to ensure that students are given the appropriate unit testing time. Breaks are not overnight. Once a unit has begun, it must be completed during the same academic day. Students are to remain in the testing environment for breaks during each unit. The student may stand up, walk around, or engage in similar activities. The exception for students remaining in the testing environment would be for the restroom or if a student needs to access special equipment, such as sensory equipment for calming. In these cases, arrangements must be made for the student to be escorted to minimize interactions with other students on a different testing schedule. Students must be assessed in individual or group testing environments with students with similar break needs. The secure standardized testing environment must be maintained, and the break activity must not be a distraction to other students. Students should not interact with one another. Students may not discuss any questions or their answers on the assessment during breaks. Secure assessment material may not be removed from the test environment during breaks. Reading, accessing the internet, or making and/or receiving phone calls is not allowed during a break.

Computer-based Assessment: During breaks, cover or turn off student computer screens. Paper-based Assessment: During breaks, cover or close student test materials.

Connecticut

Universal Feature:

Embedded: The number of items per session can be flexibly defined based on the student’s need. Breaks of more than 20 minutes will prevent the student from returning to items already attempted unless an appeal for a test-reopen is requested by the District Administrator. There is no limit on the number of breaks that a student might be given. The use of this universal tool may result in the student needing additional overall time to complete the assessment.

Non-embedded: Breaks may be given at predetermined intervals or after completion of sections of the assessment for student. Sometimes individual students are allowed to take breaks when needed to reduce cognitive fatigue as they experience heavy assessment demands. The use of this universal tool may result in the student needing additional overall time to complete the assessment.

Accommodation:

Extra/Extended Breaks

Delaware

All students may take breaks as needed. The term “Frequent breaks” refers to multiple, planned, short breaks during testing based on a specific student’s needs (for example, the student fatigues easily). During each break, the testing clock is stopped.

District of Columbia

Reading/ELA/Writing/Math:

Frequent Breaks (administrative consideration)

  • Medical Break: Student takes a break due to existence or sudden onset of a temporary or long-term medical condition. Student’s testing time stops during a medical break.
  • Individual Bathroom Break: Student requests a bathroom break within their overall allotted testing time. Student’s testing time does not stop.
  • In-Chair Stretch Break: Student pauses and stretches. Student’s testing time does not stop.
  • Other Frequent Breaks

Florida

As part of “flexible scheduling” accommodation:

A student may be administered a test session during several brief periods within one school day, allowing frequent breaks. Between sessions and during breaks (e.g., restroom breaks, lunch breaks), students must be closely monitored to ensure that they do not share information about the test.

Georgia

For some state assessments, breaks may be given between test sections. The times are determined at the local district level. See the Student Assessment Handbook (SAH) for further guidance.

Hawaii

Embedded: The number of items per session can be flexibly defined based on the student’s need. Breaks of more than 20 minutes will prevent the student from returning to items already attempted by the student. There is no limit on the number of breaks that a student might be given. The use of this universal tool may result in the student needing additional overall time to complete the assessment.

Non-embedded: Breaks may be given at predetermined intervals or after completion of sections of the assessment for students taking a paper-based test. Sometimes students are allowed to take breaks when individually needed to reduce cognitive fatigue when they experience heavy assessment demands. The use of this universal tool may result in the student needing additional overall time to complete the assessment.

Idaho

Embedded: The number of items per session can be flexibly defined based on the student’s need. Breaks of more than 20 minutes will prevent the student from returning to items already attempted by the student. There is no limit on the number of breaks that a student might be given. The use of this universal tool may result in the student needing additional overall time to complete the assessment.

Non-embedded: Breaks may be given at predetermined intervals or after completion of sections of the assessment for students taking a paper-based test. Sometimes students are allowed to take breaks when individually needed to reduce cognitive fatigue when they experience heavy assessment demands. The use of this universal tool may result in the student needing additional overall time to complete the assessment.

Illinois

Administrative Consideration:

Guidance on logistics for administrating the Illinois Assessment of Readiness with frequent breaks:

  • Medical Breaks: Student takes a break due to pre-existing or sudden onset of a temporary or long-term medical condition. Student’s testing time stops.
  • Individual Bathroom Breaks: Student requests a bathroom break within their overall allotted testing time. Student’s testing time does not stop.
  • In-Chair Stretch Break: Student pauses and stretches. Student’s testing time does not stop.
  • Other Frequent Breaks, according to state policy.

Indiana

Student Provided with Additional Breaks: Students are allowed additional breaks during testing. Some students may need to take a break due to the existence or sudden onset of a temporary or long-term medical condition, or to re-focus due to attention concerns. If this occurs, the student’s testing time is suspended during the break and is resumed upon the student’s return.

Iowa

There is no limit on the number of breaks that a student might be given. The use of breaks during the assessment may result in the student needing additional overall time to complete the assessment.

Maine

Every student is different and has varying degrees of stamina and levels of ability to stay on task. TAs may pause testing to take a break at any time. A test session for a student may consist of one or two items at a time, or ten or more items. The Test is not timed and can be paused for a variety of reasons, including frustration, lack of engagement, refusal to participate, or sickness. The TA may pause and resume the administration of the Test as often as necessary during the whole administration window. A break may consist of a few minutes to a few days, depending on the student’s needs. The MSAA system does not have any restrictions regarding pausing or length of breaks. Refer to the MSAA Online Assessment System User Guide for Test Administrators for directions regarding pausing, resuming, and submitting a test.

For some students, a break in their daily routine is very disruptive. For students who respond best to consistent routines, TAs may consider building MSAA time into their daily schedule beginning several weeks prior to testing. For example, dedicating 5 to 10 minutes during ELA instruction and 5 to 10 minutes during mathematics may improve the testing experience for the student.

NOTE: It is important to remember that breaks in testing can be given at any time. There is no limit to the number of breaks a student can receive during testing.

Maryland

Administrative Consideration:

Frequent breaks:

A student may require breaks during assignments, activities, or tests for various reasons. Breaks are allowed and may be given at predetermined intervals or on request.

During testing: There are a number of reasons why a student may need to take a break: Medical Breaks: Student takes a break due to pre-existing or sudden onset of a temporary or long-term medical condition. Student’s testing time stops. Individual Bathroom Breaks: Student requests a bathroom break within their overall allotted testing time. Student’s testing time does not stop. In-Chair Stretch Break: Student pauses and stretches. Please consult each individual assessment's Text Administration Manual for information on whether or not the testing time stops for In-Chair Stretch Breaks. Other Frequent Breaks, according to state policy.

Michigan

The number of assessment items a student will address in each testing session can be flexibly defined within the same day per test session, based on the student’s need. For online testers: if a student takes a break lasting less than 20 minutes, the student will not need his/her original login ticket to restart the online test session. If the student’s break lasts longer than 20 minutes, the student must use the original login ticket to resume his/her test session. Refer the assessment’s Test Administrator Manual for more information about system time-out rules. Note: There is no limit on the number of breaks that a student might be given in a single day. The use of this universal “break” tool may result in the student needing additional overall time to complete the assessment.

Breaks – within the same day per test session: If the text is paused and the break is less than 20 minutes, student does not need original login ticket to restart online test session; if more than 20 minutes, student must use original login ticket to resume test session.

Minnesota

After approximately every 30 minutes of testing for MCA (or on a schedule determined by the district), students may be allowed a short break.

Missouri

All students may take breaks of up to 20 minutes as needed. Usage of breaks is determined by the test examiner. There is no limit on amount of breaks. The INSIGHT student platform allows all students to pause the online assessment for up to 20 minutes. If the test is paused for more than 20 minutes, the student will have to log back in. If the need arises to move a student from one computer to another, pause the test and choose the exit button. The test will remain incomplete until the student logs back in and completes the test.

Montana

Embedded: The number of items per session can be flexibly defined based on the student’s need. There is no limit on the number of breaks that a student might be given. Breaks of more than 20 minutes will prevent the student from returning to items already attempted by the student. The student may need more time to complete the assessment depending on the number of breaks taken.

Non-embedded: Breaks may be given at predetermined intervals or after completion of sections of the assessment. Sometimes students are allowed to take breaks when individually needed to reduce cognitive fatigue when they experience heavy assessment demands. Breaks of more than 20 minutes will prevent the student from returning to items already attempted by the student. The use of this tool may result in the student needing additional overall time to complete the assessment. For students taking a paper/pencil assessment, predetermined breaks may be given such as after the completion of a section.

Nevada

Embedded: The number of items per session can be flexibly defined based on the student’s need. There is no limit on the number of breaks that a student might be given. Breaks of more than 20 minutes will prevent the student from returning to items already attempted by the student. The student may need more time to complete the assessment depending on the number of breaks taken.

Non-embedded: Breaks may be given at predetermined intervals or after completion of sections of the assessment. Sometimes students are allowed to take breaks when individually needed to reduce cognitive fatigue when they experience heavy assessment demands. Breaks of more than 20 minutes will prevent the student from returning to items already attempted by the student. The use of this tool may result in the student needing additional overall time to complete the assessment. For students taking a paper/pencil assessment, predetermined breaks may be given such as after the completion of a section.

New York

Testing Conditions: For tests longer than 40 minutes in length. Implementation Recommendations: 10-minute break every 40 minutes.

North Carolina

Breaks at predetermined intervals.

North Dakota

The number of items per session can be flexibly defined based on the learner’s need. There is no limit on the number of breaks that a learner may be given. This universal feature could result in the learner needing additional overall time to complete the assessment.

Ohio

Administrative Consideration (In accordance with principles of universal design for assessment, these administrative considerations are available to all students.):

All students may take breaks as needed. Frequent breaks refers to multiple, planned, short breaks during testing based on a specific student’s needs (for example, the student fatigues easily). During each break, the testing clock is stopped. Students should pause their test when taking a break. Students may pause their test from the student testing site or the test administrator may do so from the Test Administrator Interface. Pausing a student’s test will sign the student out of his or her test. A student who pauses his or her test and signs back into the test on the same school day will be able to revisit all the items on the test. A warning message displays after 20 minutes of test inactivity. If the student does not click OK within 30 seconds after this message appears, the test is paused and they are signed out.

Oklahoma

Allow frequent breaks during one test session (maximum 10-15 minute duration). Student test book(s) must be secured during the breaks. Students must be monitored during breaks and may not study for or discuss the test during these breaks or view/change previously answered questions after a break.

Oregon

Reading/ELA/Writing/Math:

Breaks (pausing the test): The number of items per session can be flexibly defined based on the student’s need. Note: for the CAT, if the student’s test is paused for more than 20 minutes, the student will no longer be able to return to previously answered items. There is no limit on the number of times that a student’s test may be paused. The use of this universal tool may result in the student needing additional overall time to complete the assessment. See Section 5.1 Testing Time of the Test Administration Manual for guidance on estimated testing times for online assessments.

All subject areas:

Breaks: Sometimes students are allowed to take breaks when individually needed to reduce cognitive fatigue when they experience heavy assessment demands. The use of this universal tool may result in the student needing additional overall time to complete the assessment.

Pennsylvania

Frequent Breaks: Refers to frequent breaks within a regularly scheduled test session. Do not mark “Frequent breaks” bubble for regular breaks between sections or modules of a test. Consider a separate setting for students who require frequent breaks within a test section, e.g. every 15 minutes. Students must be monitored during all breaks.

Rhode Island

Accessibility feature:

Breaks: Student requires extra breaks, extended breaks, or breaks as needed.

South Carolina

Silent break: A tool that refers to planned, short breaks during testing based on a student’s specific needs (e.g., fatigues easily, overly anxious, sensory needs).

  • Students may take breaks as needed.
  • Students must remain in the testing environment for silent breaks and engage in activities that will not disturb or distract other test takers.

There should be minimal interactions with other students

South Dakota

Embedded: The number of items per session can be flexibly defined based on the student’s need. There is no limit on the number of breaks that a student might be given. Breaks of more than 20 minutes will prevent the student from returning to items already attempted by the student. The student may need more time to complete the assessment depending on the number of breaks taken.

Non-embedded: Breaks may be given at predetermined intervals or after completion of sections of the assessment. Sometimes students are allowed to take breaks when individually needed to reduce cognitive fatigue when they experience heavy assessment demands. Breaks of more than 20 minutes will prevent the student from returning to items already attempted by the student. The use of this tool may result in the student needing additional overall time to complete the assessment. For students taking a paper/pencil assessment, predetermined breaks may be given such as after the completion of a section.

Tennessee

Accommodation:

Rest or break needed due to fatigue, behavior plan, sensory needs, and/or health related needs. This accommodation is not to be confused with a break provided for all students.

Administrative Consideration:

Providing frequent supervised breaks.

Utah

Resources for All Students:

Breaks may be given if needed. The administrator of the assessment must monitor the length and timing of breaks so that students do not have opportunity to seek answers to items on the assessment.

Vermont

Embedded: The number of items per session can be flexibly defined based on the student’s need. Breaks of more than 20 minutes will prevent the student from returning to items already attempted by the student. There is no limit on the number of breaks that a student might be given. The use of this universal tool may result in the student needing additional overall time to complete the assessment.

Non-embedded: Breaks may be given at predetermined intervals or after completion of sections of the assessment for students taking a paper-based test. Sometimes students are allowed to take breaks when individually needed to reduce cognitive fatigue when they experience heavy assessment demands. The use of this universal tool may result in the student needing additional overall time to complete the assessment.

Virginia

Planned Breaks: Students, who require breaks, but not multiple test sessions, must complete the test in one school day. Planned breaks administered under secure conditions are available for either online or paper tests. Additional information on planned breaks is available in Appendix B of the Virginia SOL Test Implementation Manuals .

Washington

Embedded: The number of items per session can be flexibly defined based on the student’s need. There is no limit on the number of breaks that a student might be given. Breaks of more than 20 minutes will prevent the student from returning to items already attempted by the student in ELA, math, and science. Refer to the pause rules in the applicable Test Administration Manual (TAM) for additional information.

Non-embedded: Breaks may be given at predetermined intervals or after completion of sections of the assessment for students taking a paper-based test. Sometimes students are allowed to take breaks when individually needed to reduce cognitive fatigue when they experience heavy assessment demands.

West Virginia

Universal Feature:

Embedded: The number of items per session can be flexibly defined based on the student’s need. Breaks of more than 20 minutes (on Reading, math, and science sections) will prevent the student from returning to items already attempted by the student. There is no limit on the number of breaks a student might be given. The use of this universal tool may result in the student needing additional overall time to complete the assessment.

Non-embedded: Breaks may be given as predetermined intervals or after completion of sections of the for students taking a paper-based test. Sometimes students are allowed to take breaks when individually needed to reduce cognitive fatigue when they experience heavy assessment demands. The use of this universal tool may result in the student needing additional overall time to complete the assessment.

Accommodations:

Extra breaks (no studying):

Allowed for: WVGSA Grades 3-8, SAT School Day, and ELPA21 Description: Students can take additional breaks as requested or at predetermined intervals. Instructional practice: Students are provided with frequent breaks during instructional activities and for tests to assist with concentration. When to select: Students who cannot concentrate continuously for an extended period or who become frustrated or stressed easily may need frequent or extended relaxation breaks. Restrictions: Students are not allowed to study for tests and must be monitored during breaks.

Notes for implementation:

  • These students may need to be assigned to a different location to prevent distractions.
  • Students are not allowed to study for tests and must be monitored during breaks.
  • The WVASA is administered in a one-to-one setting as a universal tool/requirement. It is not necessary to select this for the WVASA.

Extended breaks:

Allowed for: WVGSA Grades 3-8, SAT School Day, and ELPA21 Description: Students take extended regularly scheduled breaks; “off testing time clock” Instructional practice: Students are provided with frequent breaks during instructional activities and for tests to assist with concentration. When to select: Students who cannot concentrate continuously for an extended period or who become frustrated or stressed easily may need frequent or extended relaxation breaks.

Notes for implementation:

  • These students may need to be assigned to a different room or location to prevent distractions.
  • Students are not allowed to study for tests and must be monitored during breaks

Breaks as needed:

Allowed for: WVGSA Grades 3-8, SAT School Day, and ELPA21 Description: Students can take breaks during a test section. Timing of the test is paused during the break. Instructional practice: Students are provided with frequent breaks during instructional activities and for tests to assist with concentration. When to select: Students who cannot concentrate continuously for an extended period or who become frustrated or stressed easily may need frequent or extended relaxation breaks.

Notes for implementation:

  • These students may need to be assigned to a different room or location to prevent distractions. Typically given to students with physical or medical conditions.
  • Students are provided with breaks as requested.

Students are not allowed to study for tests and must be monitored during breaks

Wisconsin

Students may be allowed to take breaks periodically as determined by their test administrator. Students should select the pause button in the lower toolbar to pause the test and to ensure that their test questions and responses are not visible to others while they are away from their device. The pause feature lasts up to 20 minutes. If the student returns to the paused device within the 20 minutes (a countdown timer displays the amount of time remaining in the pause) the student will not need to log back into the test session. If the 20-minute time limit expires prior to the student resuming, the system automatically saves and exits the test session. To resume testing, the student will need to log back into the session with their test ticket.

Wyoming

Universal Feature:

Embedded: The number of items per session can be flexibly defined based on the student’s need. Breaks of more than 20 minutes will prevent the student from returning to items already answered by the student. There is no limit on the number of breaks that a student might be given. The use of this universal tool may result in the student needing additional overall time to complete the assessment. Breaks should not give students an opportunity to interact. (from Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium) Students should pause their test when taking a break. Students may pause their test from the student testing site or the test administrator may do so from the Test Administrator Interface. Pausing a student’s test signs the student out of his or her test. (taken from Ohio’s Accessibility Manual, p. 4)

Non-embedded: Breaks may be given at predetermined intervals or after completion of sections of the assessment for students. Sometimes students are allowed to take breaks when individually needed to reduce cognitive fatigue when they experience heavy assessment demands. Breaks of more than 20 minutes will prevent the student from returning to items already answered by the student. Breaks should not give students an opportunity to interact. The use of this universal tool may result in the student needing additional overall time to complete the assessment.

Administrative Consideration:

Frequent Breaks: All students may take breaks as needed. Frequent breaks refers to multiple, planned, short breaks during testing based on a specific student’s needs (for example, the student fatigues easily).

All rights reserved. Any or all portions of this document may be reproduced and distributed without prior permission, provided the source is cited as:

  • Lazarus, S. S., & Quanbeck, M. (2021). Test breaks: States’ accessibility policies, 2020 (NCEO Accommodations Toolkit #7b). National Center on Educational Outcomes.

NCEO is supported through a Cooperative Agreement (#H326G160001) with the Research to Practice Division, Office of Special Education Programs, U.S. Department of Education. The Center is affiliated with the Institute on Community Integration at the College of Education and Human Development, University of Minnesota. NCEO does not endorse any of the commercial products used in the studies. The contents of this report were developed under the Cooperative Agreement from the U.S. Department of Education, but does not necessarily represent the policy or opinions of the U.S. Department of Education or Offices within it. Readers should not assume endorsement by the federal government. Project Officer: David Egnor